We're alert to flood dangers, say Wyre and Fylde councils after stark report

Wyre Council says it has a number of initiatives on-going to combat and deal with flood risks
Wyre Council says it has a number of initiatives on-going to combat and deal with flood risks

The Fylde coast has seen an investment of almost £200million on coastal defences over the past decade across Fleetwood, Blackpool and Lytham.

.But a new Environment Agency report says a wider, more ‘holistic’ approach will be needed in future to deal with increasing flood risks posed by climate change.

Artist's impression of the coastal protection work at Church Scar, Lytham

Artist's impression of the coastal protection work at Church Scar, Lytham

The agency says continuing to build high sea walls, although still necessary, could not be enough.

It suggests some local authorities and other agencies need to make communities more resilient to flooding through new measures in homes such as raised electrics and hard flooring.

It also says some communities may even have to be helped to move in the face of flood risks and coastal erosion.

In Wyre, an area which faces potential flood risks from both the Irish Sea and the River Wyre, the council says its flood protection efforts already go beyond the recently-opened £62.3million coastal defences at Rossall.

A Wyre spokesman said: "We have experienced flooding in recent years and are working to tackle the issue.

"The council created the Flood Forum and Making Space for Water group (MSFW) to discuss flood risk in the borough, with issues raised from communities being referred to the Wyre MSFW, a partnership of technical officers from key agencies who work together to find solutions.

"We also support community flood groups which work with the council and agencies to help reduce flood risk and raise awareness of it to the wider community."

" As well as work with the community, our new beach management scheme aims to maintain beach levels along the frontage through a combination of beach control structures and beach management.”

In Fylde, a £19.5m Environment Agency-funded coastal protection scheme is covering an area between Fairhaven and Church Scar in Lytham and some of that work will continue into next year.

Darren Bell, Head of Technical Services for Fylde Council said “ The Council continues to work in partnership with the Environment Agency and has invested considerably in the current Church Scar and Fairhaven Sea Defence upgrade scheme.

" This scheme ai ms to reduce the risk of flooding and coastal erosion to the residents and businesses on the Fylde Coast with the replacement of the current failing defences.

"We all have a responsibility in playing our part in attempting to reduce our environmental impact, and even small changes can make a huge difference. You can keep up to date with the current sea defence project on our website www.discoverfylde.co.uk/seadefence."