Group steps up campaign to save old Fleetwood lighthouse

Campaigners gather at the Lower Lighthouse with Paul Crone and the TV team. Picture:   Ravenswood Photography
Campaigners gather at the Lower Lighthouse with Paul Crone and the TV team. Picture: Ravenswood Photography

A campaign group has made a plea for one of Fleetwood’s much loved landmarks to be saved before it is too late.

It is feared Wyre Light, the skeletal remains of a wrecked lighthouse around two miles out to sea, could soon crumble and disappear forever under the waves.

The remains of Wyre Light

The remains of Wyre Light

The structure, all but destroyed by a blaze in 1948, still gives the town a unique status, because, along with the Lower Light and Pharos structures, Fleetwood is believed to be the only town in the world with three 
lighthouses.

Concerns began to grow back in 2017 when part of the ruin collapsed further. The latest calls to save the structure, believed to be one of the last screwpile lighthouse left standing, have been made by the Save the Wyre Light Lighthouse group, set up on Facebook by resident Maureen Blair.

Maureen said: “Wyre Light is important because it gives Fleetwood its unique status and because of the history of it in its own right.

“So much of our history is in danger of being lost and I set up this group because I didn’t want to 
see that happen.”

The group’s main challenge is to discover who owns Wyre Light, which could pave the way for a grant application to shore up the structure.

Wyre Council, Associated British Ports and lighthouse authority Trinity House have all denied ownership, while some suggest the Duchy of Lancaster is the owner.

Margaret Daniels, the chairman of Fleetwood Civic Society, said: “Two years ago we tried to save Wyre Light too and even approached the Lottery Fund but without the owner, there is no chance of any funds.”

Wyre Light, designed by blind Belfast engineer, Alexander Mitchell, was the first screwpile lighthouse anywhere in the world when it was built nearly two miles off Fleetwood in 1840.