Good progress on statue of Sir Peter

Photo Neil Cross''Yvonne Johnstone, Gordon Oates, Brian Crawford, Margaret Daniels and William Hargreaves of Fleetwood Civic Society show the spot where a statue of Fleetwood's founder, Sir Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood, will be sited
Photo Neil Cross''Yvonne Johnstone, Gordon Oates, Brian Crawford, Margaret Daniels and William Hargreaves of Fleetwood Civic Society show the spot where a statue of Fleetwood's founder, Sir Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood, will be sited

The sculptor creating a statue of Fleetwood’s founder Sir Peter Hesketh-Fleetwood has almost finished his work on the full-sized figure.

Once the whole project is complete, the £40,000 bronze statue will be sited at the town’s Euston Gardens, just across the town’s iconic North Euston Hotel, and officially unveiled in May next year.

Fleetwood Civic Society and other groups have led the project to get the statue sited in the town and are pleased with the progress made.

Sculptor Alan Ward, of Lancaster, started the project by creating a 22-inch high maquette and this smaller version went on show in Fleetwood museum during the Heritage Days event back in September.

Margaret Daniels, chairman of Fleetwood Civic Society, said: “The sculptor has almost completed the full- size statue, once the finishing touches are completed and we are all happy with it will go to the foundry to be cast – hopefully at the beginning of January.

“The site of the statue can be seen in the grass where tests for the foundations have been done.

“We are all planning for and looking forward to the unveiling ceremony which is planned for May 6.

“Any extra money collected now will go towards information plaque to be placed in the park to explain the history of Fleetwood and Sir Peter Hesketh Fleetwood – this alone will probably cost in the region of £1,800.”

Money towards the statue has come from a number of sources, including a donation of £25,000 from Fisherman’s Friend boss Doreen Lofthouse OBE and £600 raised from a quiz in the town last month.

The campaign for a statue was launched after civic leaders felt it was remiss that there was no monument in the town to its founder.

Sir Peter invested heavily in the town in the 19th century and planned it meticulously, but paid a heavy price for the project; he was left bankrupt.