Pre-war Lido poster goes under hammer

The poster advertising the Lido, which is expected to fetch �1,000 at auction
The poster advertising the Lido, which is expected to fetch �1,000 at auction
  • Rare pre-war poster is set to fetch around £1,000 at an auction in London
  • It is advertising Blackpool’s Lido Indoor swimming pool
  • Blackpool was one of the first resorts to build a Lido
  • Splashing out, what was then, a staggering £75,000 on a new pool, which opened in 1923
  • At 376ft by 172ft,it was wider at its extremities than a modern Olympic pool is long

A rare pre-war poster, advertising Blackpool’s Lido Indoor swimming pool is set to fetch around £1,000 at an auction in London.

The massive 116-inch by 78-inch poster,which is on 10 joined sheets backed on linen, was printed by Ayre & Senior, who, in 1934, were based in Carter Street, Blackpool.

It is emblazoned with the words ‘Lido Indoor Swimming’ which was the ‘remedial baths’ available at the Lido.

Long before the invention of whirlpools and before showers became commonplace, it was possible to go to the Lido for a “brine bath” which, in those days,cost only one shilling and sixpence (about 8p in modern money).

More affluent customers could pay two shillings and sixpence (about 13p in modern money) for a vapour bath, a foam bath or a pine bath.

According to the poster, the Lido, at Lytham Road, also offered “ultra violet ray” treatment and even more temptingly “a hand massage”.

Blackpool was one of the first resorts to build a Lido and splashed what was then a staggering £75,000 on a new pool, which opened in 1923.

At 376ft by 172ft,it was wider at its extremities than a modern Olympic pool is long.

The Blackpool Gazette described its architecture as “Renaissance” and its style was strongly influenced by the classical. A costume could be hired for a threepenny bit (about 1p) and a cap or a towel for just one old penny.

The pool could accommodate 1,500 bathers and had changing rooms for 600.

The Lido poster is expected to sell for between £800 and £1,200 at Christie’s South Kensington on June 4.

Ayre & Senior, the Blackpool firm which printed the poster, was run by Harold Ayre, of Church Street, Blackpool; and Alex Senior, of Dutton Road,Blackpool.

At least three vintage Ayre & Senior posters are owned by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, including one for Emile Littler’s production of Lilac Time at the Grand Theatre, Blackpool, in 
1950. The lido was demolished in 2006.