Ruling on disposal of Moors Murderer's remains to be given

Brady and Myra Hindley tortured and murdered five children in the 1960s
Brady and Myra Hindley tortured and murdered five children in the 1960s

The High Court is to rule today on how the body of notorious child-killer Ian brady should be disposed of.

Orders in the case are due to be made in London on Friday by the Chancellor of the High Court Sir Geoffrey Vos.

Brady, who used the name Ian Stewart-Brady, died aged 79 on May 15 this year but his remains have not yet been disposed of.

Sir Geoffrey's ruling follows applications made in relation to the disposal by Oldham Metropolitan Borough Council and Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council.

One of the defendants in the case is solicitor Robin Makin, Brady's executor.

Reporting restriction orders currently prohibit publication of who has possession of the remains, where they are stored and any information about the intended arrangements for disposal.

Brady and Myra Hindley, who died in prison in 2002, tortured and murdered five children in the 1960s.

Four of the victims were buried on Saddleworth Moor in the south Pennines.

Brady was jailed for three murders in 1966. He and Hindley later confessed to another two murders.