Jump was “terrifying” but helps net £2k for hospice

Alison and Carl Robinson, of Fleetwood,  with Simon Clough (right) after threir successful parachute jump in aid of the Brian House hospice.
Alison and Carl Robinson, of Fleetwood, with Simon Clough (right) after threir successful parachute jump in aid of the Brian House hospice.

A Fleetwood couple who lost their little girl two months ago took on a sky high challenge for the hospice which helped them so much.

Karl and Alison Robinson’s daughter Molly was just 10 when she died after a brave two year battle with a rare form cancer - including treatment in America.

In the final five weeks of Molly’s life, the devastated family were given incredible support by the Brian House children’s hospice in Bispham.

So on Saturday, Alison conquered her fear of heights to carry out a sponsored sky dive from a daunting 15,000 feet up, over Flookburgh in Cumbria.

Husband Karl took part too, as did one of Molly’s teachers at St Wulstan’s Catholic School, Simon Clough.

Karl of Manor Road, Fleetwood, told the Weekly News: “We wanted to help them because the hospice always needs funds, and we wanted a bit of a challenge as well. I wasn’t bothered about being so high up, but Alison has a fear of heights!”

Alison said: “It was terrifying but exhilarating, in a strange kind of way. I was shaking when the time came for me to jump out, but somehow I did it.”

She continued: “Without the nurses and staff at Brian House I don’t know what we would have done. When Molly became really seriously ill at the end, I wanted to care for her at home. I had never been to a hospice and thought it might be a bit grim for Molly.

“But at home, we struggled with the feeding tube Molly needed, because of her seizures. We realised the practical, nursing side was just too much for us, so we approached Brian House.

“They were brilliant. It was a lovely place, and they even put up me and Karl, both our parents and both our brothers, so we could be close to Molly. What they do there is unbelievable and afterwards we decided we wanted to help them.”

Karl and Alison are still receiving bereavement counselling and Alison said: “The feelings never go away, but it does help to talk.”

To help their sponsored challenge.