Entschuldigung bitte! Ben’s gift from above

Ben Armstrong with the card he found attached to a German wedding balloon in Hambleton park. Below, the town of Jena in central Germany where the balloon originated following a wedding.
Ben Armstrong with the card he found attached to a German wedding balloon in Hambleton park. Below, the town of Jena in central Germany where the balloon originated following a wedding.

A newlywed couple from Germany will shortly be receiving a letter from a 12-year-old boy after he found a memento from their big day.

Ben Armstrong was playing with his friends in Hambleton park on Grange Road when he spotted a golden balloon caught in a hedge.

The town of Jena in central Germany where the balloon originated following a wedding.

The town of Jena in central Germany where the balloon originated following a wedding.

The St Aidan’s Church of England Technology College pupil originally mistook it for discarded litter and was about to bin the balloon when he noticed an attached card, all the way from Jena, in central Germany.

The balloon travelled 864 miles to arrive in the Over Wyre village and the card encouraged the person who found it to return the wedding memorabilia to them with the exact details about where it was found.

Ben said: “I was with my friends playing on the zip line and saw it in the hedge.

“It was exciting to find something from a different country which had come all this way and had travelled so far across the sea.

“Anyone could have found it and it could’ve gone anywhere but it came here.

“I’m doing German at school so I took it to my teacher and she told me what it said.

“I’m planning on returning it to them and hopefully making them happy.”

Ben, from Turkey Street, Out Rawcliffe, will send the card back to the address and hopes to keep in touch with the couple once they have received it.

He added: “I’m hoping to hear back from them and I might even keep in touch.”

Kate Armstrong, Ben’s mum, added: “It’s amazing because it’s not something you find everyday. To send a reply back to them will be a really nice thing for them to have and will show it hasn’t been wasted.”

Bianca Burke, Ben’s German teacher at St Aidan’s, translated the card.

She said: “In some areas of Germany it’s quite popular to do this but I’m not sure of its historical significance.”

Wedding cards are one of many popular acts

• The card attached to the balloon was found in a Hambleton park hedge by Ben when he was playing with his friends.

• Although the 12-year-old is studying German at school, he was unsure of some of the words and took it to his German teacher to translate.

• The top of the card reads frisch verheiratet and translates to ‘newlyweds’ or ‘Just Married’ and asks the person who finds it to return it to the address on the card.

• Ben intends to return the card and hopes to hear back from the couple. Balloon releases on wedding days have become increasingly popular in recent years and are suggested on various wedding planning websites along with releasing chinese lanterns.

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