High School shows ‘fast improvement’

GOOD NEWS: Georgia Hardacre, Toni Isaksen, Ben Carroll, Jak Fuce and Mica-India Mullender celebrate Fleetwood High School's continuing success.
GOOD NEWS: Georgia Hardacre, Toni Isaksen, Ben Carroll, Jak Fuce and Mica-India Mullender celebrate Fleetwood High School's continuing success.

OFSTED inspectors say Fleetwood High School is making very positive progress after they revisited the school following a full Ofsted inspection last year.

Two inspectors visited the Broadway school in February to monitor its progress from the last inspection in 2010.

Inspector Shirley Gornall described her findings as “a very positive picture”, and said student attainment, which had been relatively low, “was improving at a faster rate than that found nationally”.

Attainment in science improved rapidly and the proportion of students gaining two good science qualifications in 2010 was significantly above the national average.

Standards of attainment in modern foreign languages were also above the national average.

The report noted that some improvements were still needed in maths and English, but exam passes generally were continuing to improve and the school was moving in the right direction.

It was also noted: “The school has successfully focused on improving students’ motivation.”

The standard of teaching and behaviour in lessons were also praised.

Steve Roe, headteacher, took encouragement from the inspector’s follow-up visit and said: “We pride ourselves on having good relationships with parents as this is very important.

“We are delighted inspectors have noted the school is a pleasant, supportive environment where parents are made welcome.”

The inspectors also found that an increasing number of parents were taking an interest in the school life.

The level of attendance by parents and carers at school events had risen, the inspectors noted, and channels of communication had been broadened through the use of the internet.

Parents also seemed to appreciate the new style of reports on their children’s progress.

But despite the school’s sustained efforts, a significant minority of parents were still not engaged in the life of the school.